12 deals in spine, orthopedic surface technology in 2019

Written by Alan Condon | November 15, 2019 | Print  | Email

Here are 12 surface technology deals that have taken place in 2019.

1. Canadian 3D printing company Thinking Robot Studios received approval to purchase a 75,000-square-foot space in Buffalo for a manufacturing and imaging facility in October. Thinking Robot Studios plans to begin construction on the $84 million facility early next year.

2. Baltimore-based University of Maryland Medical Center partnered with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs in July. The collaboration will expand and refine the hospital's 3D-printing surgical planning program, which it uses for its cardiology and orthopedic programs.

3. Precision ADM received private investment from two 3D printing veterans, Andy Christensen and Joe Allison, in September. Both individuals invested capital to bolster Precision ADM's growth strategy in the 3D printing aerospace and medical industries.

4. Fort Wayne, Ala.-based DeKalb Orthopedics & Sports Medicine partnered with biomedical startup ActivArmorTM in September. The partnership will bring the ActivArmorTM's 3D-printed casts and splints to the practice. The 3D-printed casts are customized to fit each patient using a 3D body scan.

5. Global Regenerative Group recently partnered with Kanfit3D to distribute its medical devices in the U.S., Eastern Europe, Russia and the Balkans. Kanfit3D develops patient-specific 3D-printed implants and disposable surgical instruments.

6. Evonik Venture Capital invested in Meditool, a Chinese 3D printing company creating implants for spine and neurosurgery. Meditool's 3D-printed technology aims to enhance recovery times and reduce postoperative checks on patients as well as surgical risks for surgeons.

7. Medtronic acquired Titan Spine, a private company focused on titanium spinal implants and surface technology, in June. Titan Spine's nanoLOCK platform includes interbody implants designed for bone growth during fusion. Financial terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

8. University of California San Francisco Surgical Innovations partnered with PrinterPrezz in an initiative to bring innovative medical devices to the forefront faster. The partnership established a co-located center at PrinterPrezz, offering engineering and manufacturing access as well as an open ecosystem of technology that encourages the commercialization of new ideas quicker.

9. Interbody device manufacturer HAPPE Spine received financing from Genesis Innovation Group and its two investment healthcare funds. HAPPE Spine produces a fully porous PEEK implant for interbody spinal fusion procedures.

10. Nexxt Spine partnered with MTS Systems to develop porous 3D-printed spinal implants in March. MTS Systems is a supplier of test systems, motion simulators and sensors. Nexxt Spine is using MTS material test systems to develop spinal implants that facilitate bone healing.

11. SI-Bone signed an agreement with PrinterPrezz to develop and build services for potentially developing a 3D-printed minimally invasive sacroiliac joint fusion implant in the future.

12. LimaCorporate partnered with New York City-based Hospital for Special Surgery in January to launch the first provider-based additive manufacturing 3D printing facility for custom orthopedic implants, expected to open in 2020.

More articles on surface technology:
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Rothman, Carrum Health partner to expand healthcare benefits into tri-state area
Nexxt Spine to expand headquarters — 4 insights

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