Long-Term Outcomes of Open Carpal Tunnel Release: 8 Things to Know

Carrie Pallardy -   Print  |
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In a recent retrospective study published in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, researchers studied the outcomes of 211 carpal tunnel release cases from 1996 to 2000.

The mean follow-up time was 13 years and the researchers were able to get feedback from 113 of the patients.

 

Of the 113 patients:
•    88 percent were either completely satisfied or very satisfied with the procedure outcome.
•    74 percent reported that symptoms were completely resolved.
•    26 percent had a poor Levine-Katz function score.
•    13 percent had a poor Levine-Katz symptom score.
•    33 percent of men had poor function.
•    23 percent of women had poor function.
1.8 percent underwent repeat surgery.
•    Weakness of the hand, diurnal pain, numbness and tingling were the most common symptoms.
•    Nocturnal pain and tenderness of the incision area were the least common symptoms.

 

The researchers concluded that 13 years after carpal tunnel release most patients are free of symptoms and satisfied with the procedure.

 

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