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Pain Management Physician Compensation: 5 Points on Who Makes the Most

Written by Laura Dyrda | August 18, 2011 | Print  |
Here are five points on pain management physician compensation for both anesthesiology and non-anesthesiology specialists in 2010. 1. Anesthesia vs. non-anesthesia pain management specialists. Non-anesthesia pain management physicians received $371,481 in compensation last year, which is more than $100,000 less than pain management specialists who practiced anesthesia, according to MGMA's Physician Compensation and Production Survey: 2011 Report Based on 2010 Data. Anesthesiology pain management physicians received an average of $502,024 in compensation last year.

2. Hospital employment vs. private practice.
Both anesthesiology pain management specialists and non-anesthesiology pain management physicians were more highly compensated when they were employed by hospitals than in private practice. Anesthesiology pain management physicians employed by hospitals received $502,775, which is $64,000-plus more than their counterparts in private practice. Non-anesthesiologist pain management specialists employed by hospitals received $338,096, which is $14,000-plus more than their counterparts in private practice.

3. Multi-specialty practice vs. single-specialty practice.
Anesthesiology pain management physicians received more than non-anesthesia pain management specialists in both the single and multispecialty practices. Pain management anesthesiologists received more ($447,697) when they practiced in a multi-specialty than a single-specialty ($398,459). For non-anesthesia pain management specialists, those practicing in a single-specialty received slightly less than their anesthesiologist counter parts ($394,956), but more than non-anesthesia pain management specialists practicing in a multispecialty group ($313,674).

4. East vs. West. The highest compensating region for anesthesiology pain management physicians was the Midwest, where physicians received $511,200 on average. This is more than $120,000 higher than the lowest compensating region, the West. The highest compensating region for non-anesthesia pain management physicians was the South, where they received $356,085. These physicians received over $100,000 more than their counterparts in the lowest compensating region, the East.

5. Urban vs. rural.
Anesthesiology pain management physicians received similar compensation across the board, with the highest amount being in non-metropolitan areas ($480,057) and decreasing as the population increased. Non-anesthesia pain management physicians in metropolitan areas of 50,000-250,000 people received an average of $323,727. Data was unavailable for non-anesthesia pain management physicians for both very rural and very urban areas.

Learn more about MGMA.


Related Articles on Physician Compensation:

Spine vs. Neurosurgeon Compensation: 5 Points on Who Received More in 2010

Highest and Lowest Compensated Orthopedists in 2010: 5 Things to Know
5 Points on Which Orthopedic Surgeons Earned the Most in 2010



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