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63% of physicians would not allow their children to play high-contact sports: 5 insights Featured

Written by  Mackenzie Garrity | Friday, 08 September 2017 18:00
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In a recent Sermo survey, 63 percent of physicians around the world said they would not allow their children to play contact sports.

Here's what you need to know.

 

1. Sermo surveyed physician from 39 countries asking if physician would allow their own children to play in high-contact sports given their knowledge about the long term effects of concussions.

 

2. Within the U.S., 72 percent of Sermo physicians said they would not allow their children to play high-contact sports, such as football, rugby or hockey.

 

3. In Venezuela, 73 percent of physicians said they would not allow their children to participate.

 

4. Recently, chronic traumatic encephalopathy has been found more frequent in football players and high-contact sport athletes leading physicians to be skeptical about allowing children to participate.

 

5. In a study by the National Football League, CTE, which is caused from head blows, was found in nearly 90 percent football players.

 

More articles on sports medicine:
Do females and males respond the same to concussions? 4 takeaways
Dr. Justin Conway joins Crystal Run Healthcare: 4 takeaways
Drs. Neal EIAttrache, Misty Suri & more: 15 orthopedic surgeons treating professional athletes in July

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