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10 Key Notes on Orthopedic Surgeon Compensation in 2013 Featured

Written by  Laura Dyrda | Wednesday, 16 April 2014 09:20
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Orthopedic surgeons topped Medscape's 2014 Physician Compensation Report, with average annual earnings of $413,000.

This is $62,000 more than the second highest compensated specialty, cardiology. Here are 10 key points from the survey:

 

1. Orthopedic surgeons saw a 1.9 percent increase over last year's income on average.

 

2. Male orthopedic surgeons earned on average $64,000 more than female orthopedic surgeons last year.

 

3. Female orthopedic surgeons are more likely than male to feel satisfied with their income — only 43 percent of male orthopedists were satisfied, compared with 62 percent of female orthopedists.

 

4. The highest average compensating region for orthopedic surgeons is the Northwest, with average compensation at $468,000 annually.

 

5. Self-employed orthopedic surgeons reported earning on average $51,000 more than employed orthopedic surgeons.

 

6. Orthopedic surgeons in an office-based multispecialty group practice reported the highest income by practice setting, at $459,000 on average.

 

7. Hospital-based orthopedic surgeons reported an average of $397,000.

 

8. 18 percent of orthopedic surgeons are currently participating in accountable care organizations, and another 10 percent plan to this year.

 

9. 51 percent of orthopedic surgeons say they will drop poorly paying insurers.

 

10. 47 percent of self-employed orthopedic surgeons report offering new ancillary services, compared to 16 percent of employed orthopedic surgeons.

 

More Articles on Orthopedic Surgeons:
Healthcare Economics: 8 Ways Spine Surgeons Can Make a Difference
Entrepreneurial Surgeons: How They're Thriving Today
7 Orthopedic Surgeons Treating Professional Athletes

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