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Study: Spinal Cord Stimulation Effective for HIV Neuropathy

Written by  Abby Callard | Tuesday, 07 February 2012 00:00
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V.K. Puppala, MD, and Kenneth Candido, MD, reported that spinal cord stimulation is effective for treating HIV-related polyneuropathy at the 6th World Congress of the World Institute of Pain, according to a Medscape report.

Spinal cord stimulation is currently indicated for the management of failed back surgery syndrome, complex regional pain syndrome, inoperable peripheral vascular disease and refractory angina pectoris.

The case presented at the meeting was a 50-year-old man with a 20-year history of HIV. He was receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy and had an eight-year history of "excruciating" pain. Two eight-electrode leads were placed into the dorsal epidural space and fluoroscopically guided to T9-T10. After a successful trial, a permanent implant was inserted and the man has had a two-year reduction in his pain.


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